Tahoe releases increase; higher flows from snow melt, rain

Google Earth Image from June 2011 Truckee River at Lake Tahoe

Flows from Lake Tahoe to the Truckee River jumped 40% yesterday to 700 cubic-feet-per-second. Lake Tahoe continues to rise standing 6,227.07 feet above sea level. The Lake rose nearly 3 inches over the past 7 days. Truckee River flows surged during the week topping out at nearly 7,000 CFS through Reno and Sparks on March 22. Current Truckee River flows run at slightly more than 5,000 CFS in Sparks.

Tahoe water surface elevation and Truckee River flow at Farad, CA on March 23, 2017.

Tahoe water surface elevation and Truckee River flow at Farad, CA on March 23, 2017.

Increased flows from Lake Tahoe come before snow melt begins in earnest. More storms – although not as strong as previous storms – are expected to continue through the weekend adding additional precipitation and snowpack to the Tahoe and Truckee River basins. Tahoe stands four feet above its rim and 2 feet below its maximum elevation dictated by court decree. Tahoe has risen above its maximum elevation during periods of extreme precipitation events such as occurred in 1997.

 

Releases from Lake Tahoe increase from 500 CFS to 700 CFS on March 23, 2017.

Releases from Lake Tahoe increase from 500 CFS to 700 CFS on March 23, 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Earth Image from June 2011 Truckee River at Lake Tahoe

Google Earth Image from June 2011 Truckee River at Lake Tahoe

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About Dennis Ghiglieri

My concern for the Truckee River grew over the years. It started with picking up trash and supporting better water quality. I helped create the "living river"plan with other citizens on the Community Flood Coalition; a plan to reduce flood impacts to infrastructure through river restoration and protection of the floodplain. I understand how critical the Truckee River is to the environment – and economy – of our entire region. I'm hoping that through these pages we can all understand our connection to the Truckee River and why we need to protect it.

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