Monthly Archives: November 2013

Truckee River Flood Project cuts out community

Time was that the community came together to develop our community flood coalition flood project.  That project protected the river and the businesses and residences.  The idea was clear. Re-create a “living river” within the reality of our community with businesses, homes,  and recreation needs.  Protect the river by creating a new flood plain for the river from Rock boulevard to Lockwood.  Keep levees away from the river.  Keep levees away from residences.  Elevate critical buildings.  Restore the river and give the community parks and recreation areas for generations.

John Champion Park in Downtown Reno was built with donated labor and materials and on donated land.

John Champion Park in DownTown Reno

That was then and now — well, we have no parks or recreation, no restoration within the Truckee Meadows, a contentious road that occupies open space agricultural land, more levees and flood walls — no living river.

Can that be changed?  Will the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers honor their earlier commitments?  Will the Flood Project Board put back the park and restoration elements that the community supports and pays for with an quarter percent sales tax increase?  We think a new discussion is needed among all residents and our leaders to make sure that whatever flood project is built it reflects the values and needs of the community.

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A Unique River of the West

Lake Tahoe during a winter storm

Lake Tahoe during a winter storm

The Truckee River flows just over 110 miles from its source at Lake Tahoe through forested mountains, the town of Truckee, the cities of Reno and Sparks and ends its journey not in the Pacific Ocean, but instead in Pyramid Lake on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation.

We all have our reasons for loving this special river which rises in a large mountain lake and terminates in a dazzling desert lake.  I’m taken by its many moods as a high mountain stream of rapids and as a meandering river making blue and green way east and north through the desert.

The Truckee River flows into Pyramid Lake on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation.

The Truckee River flows into Pyramid Lake on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation.

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